Truth Lies And Advertising Pdf

File Name: truth lies and advertising .zip
Size: 2772Kb
Published: 29.04.2021

Truth, lies, and advertising

Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website.

See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details. Published on Nov 23, SlideShare Explore Search You. Submit Search. Home Explore. Successfully reported this slideshow. We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads.

You can change your ad preferences anytime. Upcoming SlideShare. Like this document? Why not share! Embed Size px. Start on. Show related SlideShares at end. WordPress Shortcode. Published in: Business , Technology. Full Name Comment goes here. Are you sure you want to Yes No. Brian Bell. Mike Dorner. Natalie Davis.

Show More. No Downloads. Views Total views. Actions Shares. No notes for slide. Adweek Books is designed to present interesting, insightfulbooks for the general business reader and for professionals inthe worlds of media, marketing, and advertising. These are innovative, creative books that address the chal-lenges and opportunities of these industries, written by lead-ers in the business.

Some of our writers head their awncompanies, others have worked their way up to the top oftheir field in large multinationals. But they share a knowl-edge of their craft and a desire to enlighten others.

We hope readers will find these books as helpful and inspir-ing as Adweek, Brandweek, and Mediaweek magazines. Designations used by companies to distinguish their products are often claimedas trademarks. Readers,however, should contact the appropriate companies for more complete informa-tion regarding trademarks and registration.

This book is printed on acid-free paper. All rights reserved. Published simultaneously in Canada. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying,recording, scanning or otherwise, except as permitted under Sections or of the United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permis-sion of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center, Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA, , fax This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information inregard to the subject matter covered.

It is sold with the understanding that thepublisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting, or other professional ser-vices. If legal advice or other expert assistance is required, the services of a com-petent professional person should be sought.

Jon Steel. ISBN cloth : alk. Advertising campaigns — United States—Planning. Advertising—United States. Advertising agencies—Customer services—United States. S73 Printed in the United States of America.

This book is dedicated to Ethel Alice Morris 6. Contents Introduction ix Firing Blanks1. Serendipity "got milk? Introduction Firing Blanks Is advertising worth saving? From an economic point of view I dont think that most of it is. From an aesthetic point of view Im damn sure its not; it is thoughtless, boring, and there is simply too much of it.

Howard Luck GossageMore than 30 years ago, Howard Gossage, a legendary SanFrancisco advertising man, gave an interview to Time maga-zine in which he said of advertising, "I dont know a singlefirst class brain in the business who has any respect for it. More recently, in , a Gallup poll asked consumersacross America to rate 26 different professions according tothe degree to which they trusted them. At the top of the list, with 65 percent of respondents giv-ing them a "very high" or "high" ethical rating, were phar-macists, closely followed by the clergy, college teachers,medical doctors, and policemen.

Farther down the list, jour-nalists lay in eleventh place with an ethical rating of 26 per-cent, senators and lawyers were sixteenth and seventeenth IX 8.

Introductionrespectively, and real estate agents and congressmen placednineteenth and twentieth. Languishing in twenty-fifth place,with only an 8 percent ethical rating, just behind insurancesalesmen, were advertising practitioners. Only one profes-sion received a lower ethical rating, and I would thus like tosuggest that all advertising people reading this should pausefor a moment, raise their eyes to the heavens, and givethanks for the very existence of car salesmen.

In my first year working in the United States, I oncenaively suggested that a commercial my agency had pro-duced might play well in movie theaters. Both my agencycolleagues and clients looked at me aghast.

The movies are the oneplace where theyre not assaulted by advertising. They gothere to escape, and we dont want to be the ones to pissthem off. As I travelaround the country conducting research for the agency, talk-ing to people from all walks of life and economic strata, Ihear consistent and heartfelt criticism of the way that adver-tising invades all parts of their lives.

Their TV and radio pro-grams are interrupted, their magazines are difficult to readbecause of all the ads that consume the features, their mail-boxes are routinely jammed with unsolicited material,blimps and planes carry messages over their cities, movingimages are projected onto the sides of buildings, and theirdinnertime conversations are interrupted by telemarketers. The American public is surrounded, with the movie theateras its final line of defense.

In , a study conducted by The Economist estimatedthat the average American is exposed to 3, commercialmessages a day in "all media.

Maybe3, messages is overstating it; other studies are more con- X 9. Introductionservative, estimating anywhere between and expo-sures in just TV, radio, magazines, and newspapers. Although I may really have seen or heard messagesyesterday, I can remember no more than about 10 of them.

Ofthose, I liked and connected to maybe only two or three. A host of other research suggests that I am not atypical. With remote control units permanently trained on everycommercial break, radios on for background noise, and peo-ple flicking randomly through magazines, the majority ofthose potential exposures just vaporize.

People do noteven need a remote control to successfully ignore advertise-ments —we have evolved to the point where we can recog-nize commercials that concern us or interest us and grantthem at least a few seconds attention, while ads that fall intoneither of those categories are prevented from taking upvaluable brain space by our newly developed mental deflec-tor shields.

Its not that advertising is failing to present itself to itstarget. It appears in our homes with monotonous regularity,but when it gets there, it often fails to make the necessaryconnections. I suppose that if advertising were a person touse a protective technique popular among moderators ofqualitative research , it would be a person with a very lowsperm count. Companies with higher advertising-to-sales ratios tend to dominate in their categories and on thewhole are more profitable.

Companies who have advertisedduring and after recessions have grown at the expense ofcompetitors who have reduced their budgets. Advertisinghelps turn products into brands; and, in turn, brands build acompanys value, sustain higher market share and higher XI Introductionmargins, and provide a powerful barrier to competitiveentry.

All those things are true, and I could have filled thiswhole book with examples of advertisings effectiveness inbuilding sales, share, and profitability. Such a history of effective advertising would doubtlesscontain many examples of campaigns whose success wasachieved more by sheer weight and presence than by smartstrategic insights or distinctive creative executions.

In theseexamples, audiences were bludgeoned into submission bylarge budgets and repetition, and I am certain that the adver-tisers concerned would say that it did not matter that peopledid not like their campaigns, or that some even found theminsulting or offensive.

As long as they met their objectivesand got a return on investment, they were happy. In an absolute sense, it is hard to argue that those com-panies are -wrong.

My argument, however, is more relativethan absolute, and it touches on two main areas. First, theenvironment in which advertising operates has changed. Companies are under intense pressure to increase their earn-ings and profits year after year, quarter by quarter, month bymonth, arid there is no category in American business wherean extra point of market share comes easily.

Companies haveto fight for distribution, for sales, for margins, and for con-sumer share of mind, which, as the number of media choicesand amount of advertising increases, becomes ever harder tocapture. Moreover, as the pressure on the bottom linemounts, the amount of resources at most companies disposaldwindles, so that every year they are being asked to achievemore, with less. There are many ways to catch trout. One, which doesnot require either training or finesse, is to buy a handgrenade, remove the pin, throw the grenade into the pool,and, when it explodes, scoop out the bodies in a net.

That isthe way that many companies have traditionally advertised,but financial restrictions mean that they now have to findmore skillful, intelligent ways of attracting and retaining cus-tomers.

Xll

[PDF Download] Truth Lies and Advertising: The Art of Account Planning [Read] Full Ebook

He identifies the do Jon began his career in advertising as a year-old account planner with the English agency Boase Massimi Pollitt. By the age of 26, he was appointed to BMP's board of directors. Serendipity: "Got Milk? About the Author. Du kanske gillar. Strengthsfinder 2.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover.

Truth, Lies and Advertising Summary and Review

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions.

Search this site. African Religions PDF. Altcoins PDF. Includes PDF.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions.

Truth, Lies and Advertising Summary and Review

Truth, Lies, and Advertising: The Art of Account Planning Adweek Books Book Reviews Everyone possess the right to accept that book as the window of the knowledge, aa door to experiencing great number of famous people experiences. Challenge yourself to learn one thing from a book, whether it is fiction or even nonfiction, must belong to your time. This great publication show that the writer is at his absolute best.

For complaints, use another form. Study lib. Upload document Create flashcards.

Pick up the key ideas in the book with this quick summary. Why do the oddball geniuses in advertising get all the credit for great projects? Probably because we have a romantic notion of Don Draper characters sitting around in skyscraper penthouses, ruminating on society and coming up with beautiful and concise taglines and copy. The truth, however, is different. And without that account planner, Don Draper would be unemployed.

2 Response
  1. Terrance T.

    Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data: Steel, Jon. Truth, Lies, and Advertising: The Art of Account Planning. Jon Steel. p. cm. — (Adweek books).

Leave a Reply